Finding the Organic Truth of Occupy Wall Street using Infinigraph and The Recorded Future

I’m continuing the thread of last weekend of Occupy Wall Street (part 1 and part 2) by examining the this popular movement through the lens of various programs I use, that way I honor both the movement and my own approach to viewing the world and organizing information within it, which in turn helps us to understand the essential nature of it (which is what Analytics, I believe, is all about, and why people get into Analytics, in the first place).

It’s also true that things are accelerating so fast and we’re seeing the world change right before us.

It’s also been a long and event packed week so far with appearances at #smm11 this week, I alluded to it in an earlier post, which led to some new information I haven’t shared yet (and  literally had no time to do so) and an interview at Business Agility Radio (on Blog Talk Radio) on Thursday afternoon and next week promises to be even more packed with Emetrics NYC, IMC, Predictive Analytics and Pivot conferences all taking place in NYC.  While I won’t be attending any of those conferences, I will be attending several social events and meeting with several of my friends who are going to be in Manhattan for these conferences including Gary Angel, Tim Wilson and Sheldon Levine (Sysomos), along with several more.  And while all of this is going on, Occupy Wall Street and Occupy events all over the country are going on, and I want to follow the thread and take it up a notch.

For example, SocMetrics found the top Occupy Wall Street influencer was Roger Ebert – but is that really workable?   Based on what? Based on what he wrote about #occupywallstreet and his followers on Facebook and Twitter?   I, myself, came up as influencer #40 but till last weekend I had never mentioned Occupy Wall Street and I really doubt Roger Ebert actually went any where near an Occupy event – so is he or I really influential?   That’s a good question and there is another, perhaps better way of finding influencers using Infinigraph Social Media Metrics.

Infinigraph is platform that takes and entirely different approach to finding influencers and finding influential content.  In a world where Keyword Search is increasing becoming less effective, and less meaningful (because there is no common lexicon for expressing many of the things we want to express, we tend to use the same words to mean different things or use different words to mean the same things, as I covered in Chapter 3 of Social Media Analytics).

As a result, a more “behavioral” approach may actually be far more effective in finding who is really influential and what is really interesting and meaningful to specific audience (say the fans of a brand or page) than any keyword search could ever be; in fact that is what Infinigraph does (there is a case study of Complex Magazine and an interview with Chase McMichael in my book, if you want to get more information in the context of Social Analytics that I examine on this blog and in my book).

So, using Occupy Wall Street and Infinigraph, what do we find that’s different than what SocMetrics and Sysomos found?  Well, take a look for yourself – here.

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Now,  these two lists of influencers are very different than what we have seen before, they are all fans of Occupy Wall Street that have shared content about Occupy Wall Street the most, who also have the most social influence as Infinigraph measures it – it’s a set of lists based entirely on behavior and the audience is telling us who is the most influential, not some disconnected and often inaccurate keyword searching – and that’s why the results are so different, and in some ways, much more believable, and useful for such diverse applications as advertising and politics (we’ll get to that shortly in a future post using Infinigraph).

It’s not so much the platforms I have examined are bad, actually, they are excellent, the problem is they go about influence and time measurement using keywords, and that is their limitation, and in some sense, their failing as text analytics and keyword analytics can not solve the problem of influence or audience sentiment in a world where the lexicons for expression of many concepts and feelings are not established or just emerging.  Perhaps, it would be more accurate to say that keyword based tools measure differently, and therefore, come up with very different results than behavioral platforms such as Infinigraph.

Last I counted, the Occupy Wall Street Facebook page had over 57,000 fans and the Twitter account had a similar number of followers – and the content these people shared and commented on the most was the following:

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Fans of Occupy Wall Street found this piece of content the most interesting in the last two weeks
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What’s interesting and useful here is that I can post this story, and others to my own Facebook or Twitter pages, in other words, I can curate the content and reuse it and Infinigraph has a bunch of ways this can be leveraged, the most common being just republishing the most engaging content on a scheduled basis to increase the overall activity (visits, engagement, clicks) by an average of 35% (which is, in itself, amazing, if Infinigraph did nothing else, though that is just the beginning of what it can do).

It also turns out the content that is also viewed by the same audience, but of other Facebook and Twitter accounts (not Occupy Wall Street) is about Al Jazeera, not surprisingly.
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And when we look at the concept of “keywords” as it is thought of in Infinigraph, what we come up with the twitter accounts that have the most “affinity” to the audience that is most active on Occupy Wall Street’s Facebook and Twitter properties – perfect and dead center accurate – it’s brilliant if, indeed, a somewhat unorthodox approach to determining what is important to the audiences under study.

TWITTER AFFINITIES (Keywords) and TARGETED INTERESTS – download the targetInterests-twitter file for a complete list.

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One way to use these “keywords” is to put them in a targeted Facebook Ad – that is what Chase McMichael recommends, but if you think about it, you can go much deeper by going into each brand and keyword, looking at it’s affinities, and come up with a much more targeted list of keywords, of likes and interests than you could ever come up with in any other way – all based on ACTUAL BEHAVIOR of the most active fans of the brand, and validated by how often the content they share is propagated (much of this is done with Bit.ly Enterprise tracking).

With Facebook, the picture gets even more interesting.
FACEBOOK AFFINITIES AND TARGETED INTERESTS (Keywords) – download targetInterests – facebook……


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There certainly are some overlaps between Facebook and Twitter audience channels, but there are also many differences, which is why there are two lists.   And certainly there are many uses for Infinigraph as a curation platform beyond what I covered here.

The Analytics that Infinigraph provides aren’t implemented yet on all accounts – but here’s an example of what a readout of Occupy Wall Street might look like in Infinigraph if it were available (which it is not yet).
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Hopefully, on Sunday I will look at The Recorded Future and show you another view of Occupy Wall Street using it’s temporal analytics, which will blow your socks off.

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