Occupy Wall Street Part 2, Merging Sysomos MAP with SocMetrics and some thoughts about the whole ball of wax

Again, the best way to test out platforms is to use them for real things and see how they work, practically – I guess that approach can go for economic and political systems, though I don’t want to go there, yet (as far as Occupy Wall Street, but I’m interested in seeing what actually moves the needle).  Continuing from my last post on SocMetrics and Occupy Wall Street:
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How and where did this all start?  The May 12th Protest?   I’m not sure if anyone knows for sure, but what I’m seeing, based on the data I can pull out of Syosmos MAP, a popular Social Media Analytics platform that most of my readers are familiar with, Occupy Wall Street appears to be (as far as I can tell) an extension of the popular protests that brought down Egypt and Libya, and attempted to bring down Iran a few years earlier  (the first reference to Occupy Wall Street was picked up on May 12th, in fact, as a Tweet, above).

The movement appears to be a reflection  the 99% of the world ruled by the 1%, don’t want to go where the 1% are taking them.

That sentiment would be reflected most poignantly by this clip in an interview by Chris Hedges.  But, there will always be ruling interests yet, they need to be more “aligned” to policies and outcomes that improve people’s lives rather than enslaving them (or worse yet, hijacking the agenda to another that just makes things better for a small minority, while having the large majority suffer).

The second reference to Occupy Wall Street was detected by Sysomos MAP on June 9th to the 90,000 members of AdBusters – it’s a signal that was very small, and probably most people would not have noticed it but in hindsight, is pretty evident.

Notice that none of the influence platform would have picked it up either – my guess is that SocMetrics, TRAACKER, mPACT, whatever, isn’t really the platform you’d want to use to figure out what is NEW, or different, or possibly  threatening, that has be a different type of system, something that is going to look for the needle in haystack, something that we don’t generally have in front of us, but can forensically look back on, once it happens.
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Sysomos MAP data pull using Occupy Wall Street and the SocMetrics Influencers (comparison).

When we’re looking for something new, then, we can’t really use any of the system platforms, as they are currently configured, since they are all based on evident influence, not hidden or invisible or “ultarviolet” movements, too small to be detected.

Yet these are exactly the signals that  may end up being the most significant, at the end of the day.

In fact, the Influence list that SocMetrics gave me accounted for a little over 2% of the total chatter online about Occupy Wall Street

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Actually, 2% isn’t bad, given the “power laws” that the 1% or 2% is considered the active voice, and the rest, listening, taking in, perhaps, doing something, perhaps doing nothing.  What’s interesting to me is that idea is OK when it comes to media creation (though you would hope to make it more equitable distribution) but increasingly not OK when it comes to political governance.    What has changed that now we might challenge the power laws, or at least, make the 1% or (.001%) more responsive?

Social Media.

Here’s where I get to say “Social Media” and it really does mean that, and isn’t about Social Analytics; people are interacting via the platforms in real time, almost, and able to make, to some extent, hive decisions, quickly, in almost real time.   Weather the situation here with Wall Street mirrors Egypt, or Libya, or Iran (a few years ago) can be debated, though the effects are evident, and must be taken seriously.

With the increased ability to participate, comes increased awareness, and the forming of a voice, or voices that want to be heard, of interests other than the elite, that want to be considered.  It seems to me this is what we’re seeing – the logical outcome of social media is an activist populace, that wants to share control, perhaps, control it’s own destiny, instead of being “hijacked” by agendas and special interests that are not ultimately, their own, and which they don’t perceive is for their own good (weather the policies are or aren’t for one’s own good can be debated quite a bit, I suspect, without ever solving anything – the important point is that they are perceived as being not for the overall good, with a good deal of evidence supporting that point of view -which is why people are camping out on Wall Street, today) .

Now, it’s hard to say, but frightening to think that it could come down to the shutting down the internet – but that’s what happened in Egypt, and to some extent, in Iran, it’s not unheard of that if things really got “out of control” here, that would happen as well, though it would wreck the economy, not that the economy is doing that well now.

According to Sysomos, for the last 6 months or so, what has been the reach in Social Media for the Occupy Wall Street movement?

Twitter Reach: 448 million impressions  with a Total Tweet Count: 184,929 (estimated total so far as of today) with perhaps 10% engaging actively, beyond tweeting once.  Since Twitter accounts for more than half of the total volume of online mentions, this is an important number to know about.
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In Mainstream media (news sites) the Total estimated impressions (view count) for results with your mentions is 14.9 million, so far.
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Meanwhile, in Forums, we seem to see a higher authority level than average (almost 5, which means Forums should get a deep dive of their own, but not today, not here).  Total estimated impressions (view count) for results was estimated at 1.8 million so far.
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Assuming these channels are not attracting the same people, about 20 million people world wide are have seen this messaging – the messaging that Sysomos has captured, over the period of May 2011 till now.  My sense is that most of that happened over the last month, though.

To finish off, the Sentiment Summary, based on Twitter, shows 2% positive and 4% negative sentiment – analysis for sentiment is usually easier for Twitter than other channels.  Note it’s based on real time data, and doesn’t reflect the last 6 months – just now.
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At the end of this I have no conclusive answers – any more than anyone else does, as to what Occupy Wall Street means – and if it will succeed, but it gave me an opportunity to exercise SocMetrics and Sysomos together – which I think improved analysis.

I think, also, what we see is that Influencers, as commonly understood by these platforms, are more dissemination of messaging, I can not think of Ebert as an “influencer” of Occupy Wall Street, as per my last post, any more than I am (having not attended the demonstrations at all and only recently commented on them – yet Socmetrics puts me at #40.

We clearly have more work to do to understand Influence, new signals and the origin of movements, such as Occupy Wall Street – we can use Social Media Analytics to understand Social Media, but in reality, we must interact in Social, to fully understand it.

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