Finding and keeping a job during the Recession using Social Networking

I wrote a lot about the Sub Prime Mortage Meltdown, the Recession, the price of Oil and the Oil Crisis, which are all drivers to making it more expensive to live and harder to stay employed or to find the next opportunity.

In fact, the New York Times just wrote about using Social Networks to find the next job offer (The Social Network as a Career Safety Net) which led me to write a long post at The Analytics Guru that ties a couple of pieces of information together – about the growth of Social Networks worldwide AND the greater use of Social Networks to create and maintain relationships that lead to gainful employment (Growth of Social Networks is also good for your Job Health).

In fact, what I’d like to see is a chart that compares the growth of Social Networks (geographically) with the growth of Job Search via Social Networks and the average number of virtual friends a job searcher has, all of it trended over time.

I don’t think that chart exists yet – and I’m not even sure where to get all three pieces of information, but I bet, if I did, it would be an indicator that Job Search Engines (I work for one, Monster.com, which is owned by Monster Worldwide) would help users more were Social Networking were also offered.

In fact, my research shows that Job Search Engines, in general, leave much to be desired when it comes to Social Networking – my chart shows Social Networking is growing, but use of Job Search Engines, isn’t – and therefore, people are finding, more and more, jobs using their network of friends, and often, bypassing traditional job search engines, as they don’t offer the richness of experience that a social network comprising of friends, has.

However, I predict that this situation will change soon, and Job Search Engines will, more and more, embrace Social Networking and Social Networks as a way to find and keep jobs.

Source: Media Metrix – Media Trend Report – United States

In fact, I wanted to go one step further, and reasoned that duplicated traffic from the Job Search Category in Media Metrix would not change much (since not many people are using Job Search Engine queries AND Social Networking – because, I suspect, the opportunities haven’t been offered and made sufficiently attractive to use) and I was right.

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